The Lying Game

Hey everyone!

Jill here, giving you my first book review as the new administrator of this site. The first book I am going to be reviewing is the first installment of a series called The Lying Game, by Sara Shepard. Firstly, here’s the synopsis from the book-

The Lying Game

 

I had a life anyone would kill for.

Then someone did.

The worst part of being dead is that there’s nothing left to live for. No more kisses. No more secrets. No more gossip. It’s enough to kill a girl all over again. But I’m about to get something no one else does–an encore performance, thanks to Emma, the long-lost twin sister I never even got to meet.

Now Emma’s desperate to know what happened to me. And the only way to figure it out is to be me–to slip into my old life and piece it all together. But can she laugh at inside jokes with my best friends? Convince my boyfriend she’s the girl he fell in love with? Pretend to be a happy, care-free daughter when she hugs my parents goodnight? And can she keep up the charade, even after she realizes my murderer is watching her every move?

From Sara Shepard, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Pretty Little Liars books, comes a riveting new series about secrets, lies, and killer consequences.
Let the lying game begin

 

 

 

My review-

This book is nothing like the television show, so even if you were a fan of the show while it was on, you can still enjoy this book series.

The first thing I really liked about this book, is that know Sutton is dead immediately. That fact alone reminded me briefly of the show Twin Peaks which aired a long time ago, but had a cult following. Although the two stories are very much unalike, finding out a pivotal character is dead immediately always makes for an interesting introduction. At least for me.

This book was a quick and easy read, I finished it in two days. Whenever I wasn’t doing my own writing, or out of the house, this book was glued to my side.

The book is told from two perspectives. One, is dead Sutton Mercer. Is she a ghost? We don’t know. She can see, hear, feel and think about everything her twin sister can, but she can’t be seen or heard herself. Oh, and she also has no memory of what happened to her, including why or how she died.

The second perspective is from her twin sister, Emma. Emma is, for all intents and purposes, the main character of the book. However, he character is told in the third person from her sister’s experiences with her. Emma is from Nevada and was abandoned by her birth mother at an early age. After being bounced around the foster system for years, she is finally thrown out of her latest foster mother’s care after her foster brother accuses her of stealing. Before she leaves, her foster brother makes accusations about Emma not being who she says she is, and shows her an internet video of another girl who looks identical to her.

After leaving her foster mother’s home Emma is led to Arizona under the false pretense that Sutton is still alive. After seeing the video of Sutton on the internet, Emma tracks her down on Facebook and sends her a private message, asking her vague questions about her life. “Sutton” writes back, explaining she was adopted that it’s very possible the two were separated at birth. The next thing you know, Emma hops  on a bus to Arizona to find her long lost twin only to discover she died before ever sending the message. Only no one knows she’s dead, and now everyone is assuming that she is Sutton.

It’s a classic prince and pauper story. Emma gets to see what she missed out on by living in foster care, while Sutton had been fortunate enough to be adopted into a well-off family.

Crazy-ness ensues when Emma finds out more information about her friends and sister Laurel, and most importantly The Lying Game.

I was very happy with this book and would highly recommend it!

4 stars.

 

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